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Metabolically Healthy Obesity—Does it Exist?

  • Patchaya Boonchaya-anant
  • Caroline M. ApovianEmail author
Nutrition (JP Foreyt, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Nutrition

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide over the past 30 years and is a major public health concern. Obesity is known to be associated with metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance and inflammation; however, there is a subset of obese subjects who have normal metabolic profiles, and they have been identified as the metabolically healthy obese (MHO). Several studies have described MHO as obese individuals who have high levels of insulin sensitivity and the absence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, or hypertension. The prevalence of MHO varies from 20 to 30 % among obese individuals. This review will discuss the MHO phenotype; the differences between MHO and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individuals; and the possible underlying mechanisms including adipocyte differentiation, immune regulation, and cellular energy metabolism.

Keywords

Metabolically healthy obese Insulin resistance Adipose tissue inflammation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Barbara S. Nikolajczyk Ph.D. for the editorial assistance.

Compliance with Ethics Guidelines

Conflict of Interest

Patchaya Boonchaya-anant declares no conflict of interest. Caroline M. Apovian received grants from Orexigen Therapeutics, GI Dynamics, MetaProteomics, Eli Lilly, Sanofi Aventis, Amylin, and Aspire Bariatrics and received personal fees from Orexigen Therapeutics, Johnson and Johnson, Nutrisystem, GI Dynamics, EnteroMedics, Zafgen, Arena, Merck, Sanofi Aventis, Amylin, and Atkins Foundation.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patchaya Boonchaya-anant
    • 1
    • 2
  • Caroline M. Apovian
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Department of MedicineBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  2. 2.Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross SocietyBangkokThailand

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