Current Atherosclerosis Reports

, 15:367

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, CVD, and Mortality: Surgical Versus Non-surgical Weight Loss Strategies

Lipid and Metabolic Effects of Gastrointestinal Surgery (F Rubino, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Lipid and Metabolic Effects of Gastrointestinal Surgery

Abstract

The burden of type 2 diabetes is increasing. The prevention of the disease, improvement of metabolic control, and more importantly reduction in mortality remain a challenge for primary care doctors, diabetologists, researchers and policymakers. In this article, the available literature is reviewed with a focus on recent developments. Comparison between medical and surgical interventions is performed using mainly head-to-head trials where possible. Weight loss surgery is effective for glycaemic control. The need for level 1 data with hard end points such as cardiovascular risk and mortality is highlighted, and the prospect of the combination of existing therapy options is emphasized.

Keywords

Bariatric surgery Type 2 diabetes Cardiovascular risk Mortality Comparative studies Metabolic surgery Diabetes 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Investigative ScienceImperial College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Diabetes Complication Research Centre, UCD Conway Institute, School of Medicine and Medical ScienceUniversity College DublinDublinIreland

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