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Statins and Diabetes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown

  • Kelly Axsom
  • Jeffrey S. Berger
  • Arthur Z. Schwartzbard
Statin Drugs (MB Clearfield, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Statin Drugs

Abstract

The ability for statins to reduce major cardiovascular events and mortality has lead to this drug class being the most commonly prescribed in the world. In particular, the benefit of these drugs in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is well established. In February 2012, the Food and Drug Administration released changes to statin safety label to include that statins have been associated with increases in hemoglobin A1C and fasting serum glucose levels. This has stirred much debate in the medical community. Estimate for new onset diabetes from statin treatment is approximately one in 255 patients over four years. The number needed to treat for statin benefit is estimated at one in 40 depending on the population. The mechanism of this link remains unknown. Statins may accelerate progression to diabetes via molecular mechanisms that impact insulin resistance and cellular metabolism of carbohydrates. It remains clear that the benefit of statin therapy outweighs the risk of developing diabetes.

Keywords

Benefit versus risk Diabetes Statins 

Notes

Disclosure

K. Axsom: none; J.S. Berger: none; A.Z. Schwartzbard: Speaker bureaus for Merck and Takeda

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly Axsom
    • 1
  • Jeffrey S. Berger
    • 1
  • Arthur Z. Schwartzbard
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of CardiologyNYU Langone Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.VA New York Harbor Health Care System, Section Non-Invasive CardiologyNew YorkUSA

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