The Prevalence and Natural History of Food Allergy

Food Allergy (T Green, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Food Allergy

Abstract

Numerous studies have demonstrated that the prevalence of food allergy is increasing. Not only are more children being diagnosed with food allergies, but studies suggest that when people outgrow their food allergies, it is taking longer than was previously thought. Studies in recent years have noted factors that may lead to a lower likelihood of developing a food allergy, including the early introduction of common food allergens, having a sufficient vitamin D level, or having a higher maternal intake of peanut early in pregnancy. Given a recent report that sensitization to common food allergens did not increase from the late 1980s/early 1990s to the mid-2000s, further studies will need to examine if the rise in food allergy prevalence is due to a change in the relationship between sensitization and clinical allergy or changes in the recognition and diagnosis of food allergy.

Keywords

Food allergy Prevalence Natural history Prevention Skin prick testing Food-specific IgE 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Kattan declares no conflicts of interest relevant to this manuscript.

The author has nothing to disclose.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe Food Allergy InstituteIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA

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