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Quality of Life Among Food Allergic Patients and Their Caregivers

  • Christopher M. Warren
  • Alana K. Otto
  • Madeline M. Walkner
  • Ruchi S. Gupta
Food Allergy (T Green, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Food Allergy

Abstract

Food allergy is increasing in prevalence worldwide. This review summarizes progress made studying relationships between food allergy and quality of life (QOL), with an emphasis on recent work in the field. Early work examining QOL among food allergy patients established that stress and anxiety associated with continuous allergen avoidance and the looming threat of anaphylaxis were associated with significantly impaired food allergy quality of life (FAQOL) for children with food allergy and their caregivers. Recent clinical studies suggest that undergoing oral food challenge to confirm food allergy and oral immunotherapy to treat food allergy may each improve FAQOL among both patients and their caregivers. Other intervention modalities, such as nurse-facilitated counseling and educational workshops, also hold promise, but additional work is needed. Future work must strive to recruit more representative, population-based samples, including adult patients, in order to improve the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings.

Keywords

Food allergy Quality of life Pediatrics Food hypersensitivity Anaphylaxis 

Abbreviations

FAIM

Food Allergy Independent Measure

FAQLQ

Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire

FAQLQ-AF

Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire—Adult Form

FAQLQ-CF

Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire—Child Form

FAQLQ-PF

Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire—Parent Form

FAQLQ-TF

Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire—Teen Form

FAQOL

Food Allergy-related Quality of Life

FAQOL-PB

Food Allergy-related Quality of Life—Parental Burden Questionnaire

HQOL

Health-related Quality of Life

QOL

Quality of Life

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Drs. Warren, Otto, Walkner, and Gupta declare no conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher M. Warren
    • 1
  • Alana K. Otto
    • 2
  • Madeline M. Walkner
    • 3
  • Ruchi S. Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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