Role of “Western Diet” in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

  • Arndt Manzel
  • Dominik N. Muller
  • David A. Hafler
  • Susan E. Erdman
  • Ralf A. Linker
  • Markus Kleinewietfeld
AUTOIMMUNITY (TK TARRANT, SECTION EDITOR)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Autoimmunity

Abstract

Developed societies, although having successfully reduced the burden of infectious disease, constitute an environment where metabolic, cardiovascular, and autoimmune diseases thrive. Living in westernized countries has not fundamentally changed the genetic basis on which these diseases emerge, but has strong impact on lifestyle and pathogen exposure. In particular, nutritional patterns collectively termed the “Western diet”, including high-fat and cholesterol, high-protein, high-sugar, and excess salt intake, as well as frequent consumption of processed and ‘fast foods’, promote obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. These factors have also gained high interest as possible promoters of autoimmune diseases. Underlying metabolic and immunologic mechanisms are currently being intensively explored. This review discusses the current knowledge relative to the association of “Western diet” with autoimmunity, and highlights the role of T cells as central players linking dietary influences to autoimmune pathology.

Keywords

Western diet Autoimmune diseases Autoimmunity Obesity Sodium Inflammatory Gut microbiome T cell regulation 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arndt Manzel
    • 1
  • Dominik N. Muller
    • 2
  • David A. Hafler
    • 3
    • 4
  • Susan E. Erdman
    • 5
  • Ralf A. Linker
    • 1
  • Markus Kleinewietfeld
    • 3
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of ErlangenErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charitè Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbruck Center for Molecular MedicineBerlinGermany
  3. 3.Departments of Neurology and ImmunobiologyYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.Broad Institute of MIT and HarvardCambridgeUSA
  5. 5.Division of Comparative MedicineMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)CambridgeUSA
  6. 6.Faculty of MedicineDresden University of Technology (TUD)DresdenGermany

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