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Annals of Dyslexia

, Volume 57, Issue 1, pp 51–74 | Cite as

Speech development patterns and phonological awareness in preschool children

  • Virginia A. MannEmail author
  • Judith G. Foy
Article

Abstract

To examine the association between speech production and early literacy skills, this study of 102 preschool children looked at phonological awareness in relation to whether children were delayed, typical, or advanced in their articulation of consonants. Using a developmental typology inspired by some of the literature on speech development (Kahn and Lewis, The Kahn-Lewis phonological analysis, 1986; Shriberg, Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 36(1):105–140, 1993a), we found that failure to master the early-8 consonants and a greater prevalence of certain types of production errors were associated with deficient phonological awareness. We also found that children who made no consonant errors had advanced phonological awareness relative to other children in the sample. In all cases, both productive speech patterns and speech errors were more closely linked with rhyme awareness than with phoneme awareness. The association between speech production and rhyme awareness may provide some new directions for the early preschool assessment of risk for reading problems.

Keywords

Phonological awareness Early literacy Phoneme awareness Rhyme awareness Speech production 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank the children and their parents who participated in this study, and the preschool administrators who made the research possible. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the assistance with testing, scoring, and reliability assessments of the following Loyola Marymount University students: Aqila Blakey, Jessica Flores, Noemi Mai, and Elva Rios.

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© The International Dyslexia Association 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Cognitive SciencesUniversity of California-IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Loyola Marymount UniversityLos AngelesUSA

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