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Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 97–106 | Cite as

Ozone: a critical contaminant produced during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) on aluminum alloys—resolving the short- versus long-duration sampling discrepancy

  • Thomas Neil McManusEmail author
  • Assed N. Haddad
Article
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

Ozone is one of the gases produced during argon-shielded arc welding on aluminum alloys. Arc welding superimposes multiple episodes of intense emission of short duration onto the background level during the work shift. Short-duration exposures during welding were measured using colorimetric detector tubes and long-duration exposures, by colorimetric badges utilizing similar chemistry. Both devices were positioned on the lapel in the breathing zone. Many of the short-duration samples exceeded the 8-h TLV–TWA (threshold limit value–time-weighted average) of 0.08 ppm for moderate work during argon-shielded gas metal arc welding (GMAW) also known as metal inert gas (MIG) welding. Some short-duration samples exceeded the transient limit of 0.24 ppm (3× the TLV–TWA), and several exceeded the maximum of 0.40 ppm (5× the TLV–TWA). Exceedance of the maximum in jurisdictions using TLVs as exposure limits necessitates control measures including effective local exhaust ventilation and respiratory protection. Ozone was undetectable (< 0.04 ppm) during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. During long-duration sampling, almost all levels during GMAW were ≤ 0.08 ppm h (≤ 0.01 ppm averaged over 8 h), the limit of detection of the sampling device. As a result, ozone is a critical gaseous contaminant (requiring control measures) during GMAW (MIG welding). Protection of the eyes against irritation in sensitive individuals dominates other considerations.

Keywords

Aluminum alloys Arc welding Critical gaseous contaminant GMAW (MIG welding) GTAW (TIG welding) Ozone Personal exposure assessment 

Notes

Funding information

This work is financially supported by CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), Brasilia, DF, Brasil and CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico), formerly Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas, Brasilia, DF, Brasil (the Brazililian National Research Council).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

11869_2018_634_MOESM1_ESM.docx (21 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 20 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NorthWest Occupational Health & SafetyNorth VancouverCanada
  2. 2.Programa de Engenharia AmbientalUniversidade Federal do Rio de JaneiroRio de JaneiroBrazil
  3. 3.Escola PolitécnicaUniversidade Federal do Rio de JaneiroRio de JaneiroBrazil

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