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Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 433–439 | Cite as

The impact of desert dust exposures on hospitalizations due to exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  • Alina VodonosEmail author
  • Michael Friger
  • Itzhak Katra
  • Lone Avnon
  • Helena Krasnov
  • Petros Koutrakis
  • Joel Schwartz
  • Orly Lior
  • Victor Novack
Article

Abstract

Desertification and climate warming trends pose a global ecological and environmental problem. The city of Be'er Sheva (Southern Israel) is located at the margins of the Sahara-Arabian dust belt and is frequently subjected to dust storm (DS) with high levels of particular matter (PM), making it an ideal location for investigating the health effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of DS on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in an arid urban environment. We obtained health data of patients 18 years or older discharged from Soroka University Medical Center (SUMC) with a primary diagnosis consistent with COPD exacerbation. Data on meteorological parameters and air pollutants were obtained from two monitoring stations in the city of Be'er Sheva. Time series analysis was performed to assess the COPD exacerbation incidence rate ratio (IRR) resulting from dust storm exposures. We found that daily PM10 concentrations were extremely high during dust storm days, and there is a positive association between dust storms and rate of hospitalization for COPD exacerbation: (IRR = 1.16; 95 %CI, 1.08–1.24; p < 0.001). In addition, an increase per interquartile range in PM10 concentrations increases the IRR by 1.03 (95 %CI, 1.01–1.06; p < 0.001). The effect increased with age and was higher in women. Short-term exposure to natural PM10 during dust storms increases the risk for hospital admission for COPD exacerbation. Further studies are needed to understand the impact of individual characteristics on the health effects of outdoor and indoor PM pollution from dust storms.

Keywords

Air pollution Desert dust Epidemiology Particular matter Respiratory admissions 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Israeli Environmental Health Fund (EHF) Grant # RGA 1004. The authors would like to thank Mr. Hilel Vardi for providing programming support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alina Vodonos
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Michael Friger
    • 1
  • Itzhak Katra
    • 3
  • Lone Avnon
    • 4
  • Helena Krasnov
    • 3
  • Petros Koutrakis
    • 5
  • Joel Schwartz
    • 5
  • Orly Lior
    • 4
  • Victor Novack
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health SciencesBen-Gurion University of the NegevBe’er ShevaIsrael
  2. 2.Clinical Research CenterSoroka University Medical CenterBe’er ShevaIsrael
  3. 3.Department of Geography and Environmental Development, Faculty of Humanities and Social SciencesBen-Gurion University of the NegevBe’er ShevaIsrael
  4. 4.Soroka University Medical CenterBe’er ShevaIsrael
  5. 5.Department of Environmental HealthHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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