Current Treatment Options in Oncology

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 41–54 | Cite as

Advances and Future Directions in the Targeting of HER2-positive Breast Cancer: Implications for the Future

  • Ishwaria M. Subbiah
  • Ana Maria Gonzalez-Angulo
Breast Cancer (CI Falkson, Section Editor)

Opinion statement

The natural history of HER2-positive breast cancer significantly changed in the past 15 years. Form being the most aggressive type of breast cancer, it became treatable with important cure rates. However, with new and successful drugs, resistance emerges. Progress in research and drug development continues to make available effective anti-HER2 therapies. Our challenge today is to use these tools correctly by looking at the data that support the indications of each compound and to continue clinical trial participation.

Keywords

HER2-positive breast cancer Trastuzumab resistance Pertuzumab T-DM1 PI3K signaling Immunotherapy 

References and Recommended Reading

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ishwaria M. Subbiah
    • 1
  • Ana Maria Gonzalez-Angulo
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Cancer MedicineThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Breast Medical OncologyThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Systems BiologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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