Current Treatment Options in Oncology

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 157–167

Operable breast cancer

  • Mary Cianfrocca
  • Lori J. Goldstein
Article

Opinion statement

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among American women. As a result of widespread screening, most patients present with operable breast cancer that is treated with curative intent. It is well established that the appropriate use of adjuvant therapy improves the disease-free and overall survival of patients with breast cancer. Adjuvant systemic therapy options include tamoxifen for hormone receptorpositive patients, and systemic polychemotherapy. It is standard clinical practice to administer adjuvant systemic therapy to patients with node-positive and high-risk, node-negative breast cancer.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Cianfrocca
    • 1
  • Lori J. Goldstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Fox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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