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Preparation, Structure and Performances of Cross-Linked Regenerated Cellulose Fibers

  • Jie Liu
  • Huaifang Wang
  • Lin Zhang
  • Shuying Sui
  • Rui Zhang
  • Chaohong Dong
  • Yun Liu
  • Ping ZhuEmail author
Chemistry
  • 6 Downloads

Abstract

Cross-linked regenerated cellulose fibers (CRCFs) were prepared by wet spinning firstly and then treated by high temperature curing. Cellulose dissolved in ionic liquid together with wrinkle proofing agent and cross-linking agent was employed as spinning solution. The properties and structure of CRCFs were investigated. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis show that CRCFs were prepared successfully and the crystal form of the fibers remained the same before and after cross-linking. The results indicate that CRCFs prepared in this study possess more excellent wrinkle recovery ability and wash durability than those treated by finishing process.

Key words

cellulose wet spinning cross-linking wrinkle recovery mechanical properties wash durability 

CLC number

TQ 341 

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Copyright information

© Wuhan University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jie Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huaifang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lin Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuying Sui
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rui Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chaohong Dong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yun Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ping Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Textiles & Clothing/Institute of Functional Textiles and Advanced Materials/State Key Laboratory of Bio-Fibers and Eco-TextilesQingdao UniversityShandongChina
  2. 2.Collaborative Innovation Center of Marine Biomass FibersMaterials and Textiles of Shandong ProvinceShandongChina

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