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ZDM

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 171–183 | Cite as

Survey of key concepts in enactivist theory and methodology

  • David A. ReidEmail author
  • Joyce Mgombelo
Survey Paper

Abstract

This article discusses key concepts within enactivist writing, focussing especially on concepts involved in the enactivist description of cognition as embodied action: perceptually guided action, embodiment, and structural coupling through recurrent sensorimotor patterns. Other concepts on which these concepts depend are also discussed, including structural determinism, operational closure, autonomy, autopoiesis, consensual domains, and cognition as effective action. Some related concepts that follow from an enactivist view of cognition are considered, in particular bringing forth a world and languaging. The use of enactivism as a methodology in mathematics education is also outlined. References to mathematics education research reported in this issue and elsewhere are used throughout to provide illustrations.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Operational Closure Mindfulness Meditation Mathematics Education Research Structural Coupling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks to Tom Kieren for a very inspiring dog walking story. Thanks to Lolis Lozano, Laurinda Brown, Alf Coles, Teresa Rojano and Brent Davis for comments on earlier drafts.

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Copyright information

© FIZ Karlsruhe 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universität BremenBremenGermany
  2. 2.Acadia UniversityWolfvilleCanada
  3. 3.Brock UniversitySt CatharinesCanada

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