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ZDM

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 91–104 | Cite as

A social perspective on technology-enhanced mathematical learning: from collaboration to performance

  • George Gadanidis
  • Vince GeigerEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

This paper documents both developments in the technologies used to promote learning mathematics and the influence on research of social theories of learning, through reference to the activities of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI), and argues that these changes provide opportunity for the reconceptualization of our understanding of mathematical learning. Firstly, changes in technology are traced from discipline-specific computer-based software through to Web 2.0-based learning tools. Secondly, the increasing influence of social theories of learning on mathematics education research is reviewed by examining the prevalence of papers and presentations, which acknowledge the role of social interaction in learning, at ICMI conferences over the past 20 years. Finally, it is argued that the confluence of these developments means that it is necessary to re-examine what it means to learn and do mathematics and proposes that it is now possible to view learning mathematics as an activity that is performed rather than passively acquired.

Keywords

Technology Collaboration Performance Learning Mathematics 

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Copyright information

© FIZ Karlsruhe 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationAustralian Catholic UniversityBrisbaneAustralia

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