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Gender impact on the correlations between Graves’ hyperthyroidism and hyperuricemia in Chinese

  • Xuehui Liu
  • Jianping Zhang
  • Zhaowei Meng
  • Qiang Jia
  • Jian Tan
  • Guizhi Zhang
  • Xue Li
  • Na Liu
  • Tianpeng Hu
  • Pingping Zhou
  • Qing Zhang
  • Kun Song
  • Qiyu Jia
Original Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

Objective

An increased level of serum uric acid (SUA) can be observed in patients with hypothyroidism. Nonetheless, data on the relationship between hyperuricemia and hyperthyroidism was still controversial. Thus, we aimed to analyze the association between Graves’ hyperthyroidism and hyperuricemia in Chinese men and women.

Methods

We recruited 103 male and 254 female patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism, as well as the same number of control subjects. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood tests were collected and analyzed statistically by binary logistic regressions to determine the risk of developing hyperuricemia in hyperthyroidism.

Results

SUA levels in males were significantly higher than that in females in both patients and controls. SUA levels were also significantly increased in hyperthyroid patients compared to in controls in both genders. The incidence of hyperuricemia rose significantly in subjects with hyperthyroidism with a higher prevalence in males than in females. SUA was negatively correlated with age and fasting glucose in male hyperthyroid patients, while it was positively correlated with body height, body weight, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine in female patients. Hyperthyroidism was a risk factor for hyperuricemia with an odd ratio of 4.536 for men and 2.730 for women.

Conclusions

For hyperuricemia, hyperthyroidism was an important risk factor that should not be neglected, especially for men.

Keywords

Gender Graves’ disease (GD) Hyperthyroidism Hyperuricemia Serum uric acid (SUA) 

Notes

Author contributions statement

Zhaowei Meng and Jian Tan designed the investigation.

Xuehui Liu, Jianping Zhang, Zhaowei Meng, Qiang Jia, Guizhi Zhang, Xue Li, Na Liu, Tianpeng Hu, Pingping Zhou, Qing Zhang, Kun Song, and Qiyu Jia conducted the investigation and collected data.

Jianping Zhang, Zhaowei Meng, and Xue Li performed the statistics.

Jianping Zhang, Zhaowei Meng, and Xue Li wrote the main manuscript.

All authors reviewed and proved the manuscript.

Funding

This study was supported by the National Key Clinical Specialty Project (awarded to the Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology).

This study was supported by the Tianjin Medical University General Hospital New Century Excellent Talent Program; Young and Middle-aged Innovative Talent Training Program from Tianjin Education Committee; and Talent Fostering Program (the 131 Project) from Tianjin Education Committee, Tianjin Human Resources and Social Security Bureau (awarded to Zhaowei Meng).

This study was supported by the China National Natural Science Foundation grant 81571709, Key Project of Tianjin Science and Technology Committee Foundation grant 16JCZDJC34300 (awarded to Zhaowei Meng).

This study was supported by the Tianjin Science and Technology Committee Foundation grants 11ZCGYSY05700, 12ZCZDSY20400, and 13ZCZDSY20200 (awarded to Qing Zhang, Qiyu Jia, and Kun Song). This study was also supported by the following grants. China National Natural Science Foundation grant #81870533, #71804124, #81872235. Key Project of Tianjin Science and Technology Committee Foundation grant #15YFYZSY00020. Tianjin Science and Technology Committee Foundation grant #17JCYBJC25400, #15JCYBJC28000. Tianjin Education Committee grant #20110152. Tianjin Health Bureau grant #2015KZ117.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Xuehui Liu declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Jianping Zhang declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Zhaowei Meng declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Qiang Jia declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Jian Tan declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Xue Li declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Guizhi Zhang declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Na Liu declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Tianpeng Hu declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Pingping Zhou declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Qing Zhang declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Kun Song declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Qiyu Jia declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuehui Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianping Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhaowei Meng
    • 2
  • Qiang Jia
    • 2
  • Jian Tan
    • 2
  • Guizhi Zhang
    • 2
  • Xue Li
    • 2
  • Na Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tianpeng Hu
    • 2
  • Pingping Zhou
    • 2
  • Qing Zhang
    • 3
  • Kun Song
    • 3
  • Qiyu Jia
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineThird Central Hospital of Tianjin, Tianjin Institute of Hepatobiliary Disease, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Artificial Cell Engineering Technology Research Center of Public Health MinistryTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Nuclear MedicineTianjin Medical University General HospitalTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Health ManagementTianjin Medical University General HospitalTianjinPeople’s Republic of China

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