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Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 180, Issue 2, pp 489–495 | Cite as

Motility of the ureter of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

  • D. Rasidovic
  • S. J. Bund
Original Article

Abstract

Background

The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a commonly used animal model of hypertension and transplantation studies provide evidence for a renal element to the aetiology of the hypertensive process.

Aims

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the contractile function of the ureter of the SHR differs to that of the normotensive control Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rat.

Methods

Ureter segments from SHR (n = 16) and WKY (n = 16) were cannulated and pressurised in vitro. Acetylcholine (ACh) was used to stimulate phasic contractile pressure responses.

Results

SHR ureter contractile frequencies were significantly greater than those of WKY (6.6 ± 0.8 vs. 3.8 ± 0.2 min−1 in 10−5 M ACh; p < 0.01). Magnitudes of contractile responses were not significantly different (SHR 14.3 ± 1.5 mmHg, WKY 15.2 ± 2.1 mmHg).

Conclusions

SHR ureteral contractile function differs significantly to that of normotensive WKY. Ureteral dysfunction may be a contributory causative factor in the aetiology of the hypertensive disease process.

Keywords

Ureter Urothelium Acetylcholine Smooth muscle Nitric oxide Hypertension Spontaneously hypertensive rat 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by the UCD Seed Funding Scheme and the UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science.

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Health Sciences CentreUniversity College DublinDublin 4Ireland

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