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Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 179, Issue 1, pp 51–55 | Cite as

An audit of hip fracture services in the Mater Hospital Dublin 2001 compared with 2006

  • L. Cogan
  • A. J. Martin
  • L. A. Kelly
  • J. Duggan
  • D. Hynes
  • D. Power
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based practice supports the provision of integrated geriatric multidisciplinary care for older people with hip fractures.

Aims

To show that introduction of orthogeriatric services resulted in improved care and better patient outcomes.

Methods

We compared two audits: a 2001 audit of 103 patients over the age of 65 years with hip fracture and a 2006 audit on 98 admissions using the same parameters.

Results

Inpatient mortality dropped from 20% to 8%. Discharge to home increased from 8% to 18% and to nursing home fell from 25% to 21%. Prescription of perioperative antibiotics, DVT prophylaxis and osteoporosis medications improved. There were no significant differences in age or sex but there were significantly higher levels of disability in the 2001 group.

Conclusion

Following introduction of an orthogeriatric service, improvements in mortality and discharge destination occurred. This may have been influenced by higher proportions of disability among the 2001 cohort.

Keywords

Hip fractures Aged Orthogeriatrics Osteoporosis Geriatrics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the input of Ms. M. Vartuli from the Information Management Services in the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital for providing length of stay data.

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Cogan
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. J. Martin
    • 1
  • L. A. Kelly
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Duggan
    • 1
  • D. Hynes
    • 3
  • D. Power
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine for the Older PersonMater Misericordiae University HospitalDublin 7Ireland
  2. 2.Keele UniversityStaffordshireUK
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryMater Misericordiae University HospitalDublin 7Ireland

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