Irish Journal of Medical Science

, Volume 177, Issue 4, pp 379–381

Elevated blood pressure in overweight and obese Irish children

  • F. M. Finucane
  • S. Pittock
  • M. Fallon
  • M. Hatunic
  • K. Ong
  • N. Burns
  • C. Costigan
  • N. Murphy
  • J. J. Nolan
Brief Report

Abstract

Background

The Irish childhood obesity epidemic, one of the highest ranking internationally, represents a major threat to public health. We sought to perform a retrospective observational study of a clinic based cohort of obese Irish children.

Methods

Clinical data relating to gender, age, height, weight, body mass index and blood pressure were analysed, from 206 children referred to a paediatric endocrine referral centre over a 15-year period for assessment of obesity.

Results

Younger patients tended to have a higher standardised body mass index at initial presentation; 92% of boys and 96% of girls referred were obese (age-related BMI ≥ 95th percentile). Boys (51%) and girls (49%) had initial blood pressure measurements in the hypertensive range. There was a correlation between the degree of obesity and systolic blood pressure, particularly in boys.

Conclusions

Obese Irish children present with significant long-term health risks, including hypertension at baseline.

Keywords

Children Hypertension Irish Overweight Obesity 

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. M. Finucane
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Pittock
    • 3
  • M. Fallon
    • 3
  • M. Hatunic
    • 1
  • K. Ong
    • 2
  • N. Burns
    • 1
  • C. Costigan
    • 3
  • N. Murphy
    • 3
  • J. J. Nolan
    • 1
  1. 1.Metabolic Research Unit, Hospital 5St James’s HospitalDublin 8Ireland
  2. 2.Medical Research Council Epidemiology UnitInstitute of Metabolic ScienceCambridgeUK
  3. 3.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes MellitusOur Lady’s Hospital for Sick ChildrenDublin 12Ireland

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