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Farmer perspectives on agroforestry opportunities and constraints in cape verde

  • James E. Johnson
  • Orlando J. Delgado
Article

Abstract

In the Água de Gato Watershed on the island of Santiago, Cape Verde Islands, 51 farmers were surveyed regarding their attitudes and knowledge of agroforestry. The farmers identified eight constraints to agroforestry implementation, with virtually all indicating that a source of loan funds was the major concern. Space or land constraints and availability of tree seedlings were identified as constraints by 94% and 88%, respectively. Despite these concerns, 92% of the farmers expressed a willingness to adopt or improve agroforestry practices in the watershed, with 73% expressing a willingness to establish fruit trees, 53% willing to establish trees or shrubs for fuelwood, and 16% willing to plant trees for shade.

Keywords

Africa agroforestry extension farming systems 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Johnson
    • 1
  • Orlando J. Delgado
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forestry, Mail Code 0324 College of Natural Resources 324 Cheatham HallVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.National Institute for Rural Engineering and ForestryRibeira Grande, Santo AntáoRepublic of Cape Verde

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