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Sophia

, Volume 57, Issue 2, pp 275–294 | Cite as

Call or Question: a Rehabilitation of Conscience as Dialogical

  • Nathan Eric DickmanEmail author
Article
  • 63 Downloads

Abstract

It is by way of the call that one is enabled to wake up to responsibility. What is the illocutionary mood of the ‘call’ of conscience, though? Is this transcendental enabler of responsibility an imposing demand or an invitational question? Both Levinas and Heidegger emphasize the impositional character of the call(er) in conscience. The call seems to be the very essence of imperatives. I develop an apology for questioning by way of appeal to crumbs scattered throughout Jewish traditions as well as throughout the works of Levinas and Heidegger. Perhaps we are invited to be rather than told to be.

Keywords

Levinas Heidegger Conscience Call Question 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Religion and PhilosophyYoung Harris CollegeYoung HarrisUSA

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