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JOM

, 61:11 | Cite as

Semi-solid induction forging of metallic glass matrix composites

  • Douglas C. HofmannEmail author
  • Henry Kozachkov
  • Hesham E. Khalifa
  • Joseph P. Schramm
  • Marios D. Demetriou
  • Kenneth S. Vecchio
  • William L. Johnson
Feature Semi-solid Induction Forging

Abstract

Metallic glasses have high strengths but are inherently brittle. To overcome this shortfall, metallic glass composites can be created by growing soft, crystalline particles in the glass to make it tougher. Processing these composites is difficult by any known method because they oxidize badly in open air and have high viscosity. This article describes a one-step casüng process by which complex components can be made, opening the possibility for commercial and military hardware produced from high-strength toughened glassy composites.

Keywords

Viscosity Brittle Matrix Composite High Viscosity Metallic Glass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas C. Hofmann
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Henry Kozachkov
    • 1
  • Hesham E. Khalifa
    • 3
  • Joseph P. Schramm
    • 1
  • Marios D. Demetriou
    • 1
  • Kenneth S. Vecchio
    • 3
  • William L. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Keck Laboratory of Engineering MaterialsCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  2. 2.Liquidmetal TechnologiesRancho Santa MargaritaUSA
  3. 3.Department of NanoEngineeringUniversity of California at San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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