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JOM

, Volume 59, Issue 11, pp 22–30 | Cite as

The role of metallurgy in the NIST investigation of the World Trade Center towers collapse

  • S. W. Banovic
  • T. Foecke
  • W. E. Luecke
  • J. D. McColskey
  • C. N. McCowan
  • T. A. Siewert
  • F. W. Gayle
Overview Feature

Abstract

On August 21, 2002, on the direction of the U.S. Congress, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated an investigation into the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In support of the overall investigation goals, the NIST Metallurgy and Materials Reliability Divisions pursued three objectives: assess the quality of the steel used in the construction of the towers, determine mechanical properties of the steel for input to the finite element models of the building collapse, and assess the failure mechanisms of the recovered steel components. This article describes the major findings of the metallurgical part of the NIST WTC investigation and shows how the findings were integrated into the investigation.

Keywords

World Trade Center Federal Emergency Management Agency Exterior Wall Core Column World Trade Center Disaster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. W. Banovic
    • 1
  • T. Foecke
    • 1
  • W. E. Luecke
    • 1
  • J. D. McColskey
    • 2
  • C. N. McCowan
    • 2
  • T. A. Siewert
    • 2
  • F. W. Gayle
    • 1
  1. 1.the Metallurgy Divisionthe National Institute of Standards and Technology, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of CommerceGaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.the Materials Reliability Divisionthe National Institute of Standards and Technology, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of CommerceGaithersburgUSA

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