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JOM

, Volume 57, Issue 1, pp 72–79 | Cite as

The mechanical behavior of GLARE laminates for aircraft structures

  • Guocai Wu
  • J. -M. Yang
Overview Failure In Structural Materials

Abstract

GLARE (glass-reinforced aluminum laminate) is a new class of fiber metal laminates for advanced aerospace structural applications. It consists of thin aluminum sheets bonded together with unidirectional or biaxially reinforced adhesive prepreg of high-strength glass fibers. GLARE laminates offer a unique combination of properties such as outstanding fatigue resistance, high specific static properties, excellent impact resistance, good residual and blunt notch strength, flame resistance and corrosion properties, and ease of manufacture and repair. GLARE laminates can be tailored to suit a wide variety of applications by varying the fiber/resin system, the alloy type and thickness, stacking sequence, fiber orientation, surface pretreatment technique, etc. This article presents a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of various GLARE laminates under different loading conditions.

Keywords

Fatigue Fatigue Crack Fatigue Crack Growth Residual Strength Aluminum Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guocai Wu
    • 1
  • J. -M. Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.the Department of Materials Science and Engineeringthe University of CaliforniaLos Angeles

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