Journal of Children's Orthopaedics

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 343–347

Electronic monitoring of scoliosis brace wear compliance

  • Tariq Rahman
  • Battugs Borkhuu
  • Aaron G. Littleton
  • Whitney Sample
  • Ed Moran
  • Stephen Campbell
  • Kenneth Rogers
  • J. Richard Bowen
Technical Note

Abstract

Purpose

Accurate evaluation of patient compliance with scoliosis brace usage has been a challenge for physicians treating patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This inability to accurately measure compliance has resulted in difficulty in determining brace treatment efficacy. This prospective study was performed to demonstrate the efficacy of using a new electronic brace compliance monitor, the Cricket.

Methods

The Cricket is a small encased circuit that can be attached to the brace and, by means of a temperature sensor, can record brace wear times. This study included ten subjects with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who were prescribed the Wilmington scoliosis brace (thoraco-lumbo-sacral orthosis) into which the Cricket sensor was incorporated. Subjects kept a diary of brace wear times.

Results

Comparisons of data for the Cricket, subject diaries, and prescribed brace wear were evaluated. The mean error between the diary times and Cricket recording was 2%. Patient compliance was 78%.

Conclusions

The Cricket is a reliable, accurate, and sensitive device to determine patient compliance with scoliosis brace usage.

Keywords

Idiopathic scoliosis Thoraco-lumbo-sacral orthosis Brace compliance Compliance sensor Scoliosis brace efficacy 

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Copyright information

© EPOS 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tariq Rahman
    • 1
  • Battugs Borkhuu
    • 2
  • Aaron G. Littleton
    • 3
  • Whitney Sample
    • 1
  • Ed Moran
    • 4
  • Stephen Campbell
    • 4
  • Kenneth Rogers
    • 5
  • J. Richard Bowen
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical ResearchAlfred I. duPont Hospital for ChildrenWilmingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Spine and Brain SurgeryNational Orthopedic and Research Center of MongoliaUlaanbaatarMongolia
  3. 3.Spinal Concepts, Inc.ReadingUSA
  4. 4.Lawall Prosthetics-Orthotics, Inc.PhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Department of OrthopedicsAlfred I. duPont Hospital for ChildrenWilmingtonUSA

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