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A Systematic Literature Review on Computational Musicology

  • Bhavya Mor
  • Sunita Garhwal
  • Ajay KumarEmail author
Original Paper
  • 8 Downloads

Abstract

Heartbeat retains a musical rhythm and music speaks whenever words fail. This paper provides a systematic review of the papers related to computational musicology. This surveys 136 papers in more than 40 Journals and various Conference proceedings. The paper discusses the computational aspects of various music operations such as composition, analysis, retrieval, classification and implicit learning. The authors evaluate the literature based on multiple computational fields like formal grammar, hidden Markov model, n-gram, finite-state machine, finite-state transducer and artificial grammar learning. The paper aims to generate a comprehensive description of research on computational musicology. Throughout the paper, the significant trends in research on computational fields in music are summarized.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Bhavya Mor was supported under Senior Research Fellowship (SRF) by Human Resource Development (HRD) Group of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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© CIMNE, Barcelona, Spain 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computer Science and Engineering DepartmentThapar Institute of Engineering and TechnologyPatialaIndia

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