Plant Biotechnology Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 345–351 | Cite as

Plant genome editing in the European Union—to be or not to be—a GMO

  • Thorben Sprink
  • Janina Metje
  • Joachim Schiemann
  • Frank Hartung
Review Article

Abstract

New plant-breeding techniques have been boosting plant breeding, since only a few years but already first promising products are pushing to the market. In contrast to this, in many countries, the current Directives regulating genetically modified organisms have been established more than 25 years ago, especially in the European Union being based on clear differentiation between transgenic plants and conventional breeding. Therefore, the question arises if these Directives are suitable to face the new challenge of genetic engineering or if there is a need for updated regulations.

Keywords

Genome editing GMO regulation NPBTs CRISPR/Cas Side directed nucleases Regulatory framework 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Plant Biotechnology and Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Biosafety in Plant BiotechnologyJulius Kuehn InstituteQuedlinburgGermany
  2. 2.Research Group AutophagyMax Plank Institute for Biophysical ChemistryGottingenGermany

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