Biomimetic sequestration of carbon dioxide using an enzyme extracted from oyster shell

Article

Abstract

Carbon dioxide sequestration activity was compared and evaluated using bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), and a water soluble protein extract derived from hemocytes from diseased shell (HDS). Para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) was used to measure the reaction rate. The k cat /K m values obtained from the Lineweaver-Burk and Michaelis-Menten equations were 230.7M1s−1 for BCA and 194.1Ms for HDS. Without a biocatalyst, CaCO3 production took 15 seconds on average, while it took 5 seconds on average when BCA or HDS were present, indicating an approximately 3-fold enhancement of CaCO3 production rate by the biocatalysts. The biocatalytic hydration of CO2 and its precipitation as CaCO3 in the presence of biocatalysts were investigated.

Key words

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase Hemocytes from Diseased Shell Biomineralization 

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Copyright information

© Korean Institute of Chemical Engineers, Seoul, Korea 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Biological EngineeringKorea UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Korea Institute of Energy ResearchDaejeonKorea

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