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Journal of Marine Science and Application

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 105–111 | Cite as

Experimental study on the resistance of a transport ship navigating in level ice

  • Yan Huang
  • Jianqiao Sun
  • Shaopeng Ji
  • Yukui Tian
Article
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

This study investigates the resistance of a transport ship navigating in Arctic waters by conducting a series of model tests in an ice tank at Tianjin University. The laboratory-scale model ship was mounted on a rigid carriage using a one-directional load cell and then towed through an ice sheet at different speeds. We observed the ice-breaking process at different parts of the ship and motion of the ice floes and measured the resistances under different speeds to determine the relationship between the ice-breaking process and the ice resistance. The bending failure at the shoulder area was found to cause maximum resistance. Furthermore, we introduced the analytical method of Lindqvist (1989) for estimating ice resistance and then compared these calculated results with those from our model tests. The results indicate that the calculated total resistances are higher than those we determined in the model tests.

Keywords

ice model test transport ship ice resistance ice-breaking process level ice 

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Copyright information

© Harbin Engineering University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yan Huang
    • 1
  • Jianqiao Sun
    • 1
  • Shaopeng Ji
    • 2
  • Yukui Tian
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Hydraulic Engineering Simulation and SafetyTianjin UniversityTianjinChina
  2. 2.China Ship Scientific Research CenterWuxiChina

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