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Effect of seismic design details on hysteresis performance of SRC-RC transfer columns

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Abstract

Four types of seismic design details were tested using 11 transfer column specimens and one comparison specimen of RC under low cyclic reversed loading. Test results show that diagonal cracks control the failure pattern and damage occurs mainly in the RC section with weak shear capacity in the transfer columns. There is a large difference in the bearing capacity and ductility of the transfer columns according to the test results, which indicates that the strengthening effect of diverse structural measures is quite different. The section ratio of I-section-encased steel and the axial compression ratio also have a great influence on the bearing capacity and ductility. Although the bearing capacity of transfer columns with additional longitudinal bars and additional X bars is relatively large, they have poor deformation capacity. Setting more stirrups along the columns is the best structural measure to enhance the seismic performance. The studs on the I-section-encased steel by welding can help to complete the stress transfer between the steel and concrete, and avoid performance degradation of the two materials due to bonding failure.

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Abbreviations

h :

Height of cross section (mm)

b :

Width of cross section (mm)

I :

Clear height of specimens (mm)

n :

Axial compression ratio (-)

N :

Axial load (kN)

f c :

Axial compressive strength of concrete (MPa)

A :

Cross section area of specimens (mm2)

p :

Section ratio of I-section-encased steel (-)

ρ ss :

Section ratio of I-section-encased steel (-)

L ss :

Extended length of I-section-encased steel in transfer columns (mm)

s :

Spacing of stirrups (mm)

d :

Diameter of stirrups (mm)

f y :

Yield tensile strength (MPa)

f u :

Ultimate tensile strength (MPa)

E s :

Elastic modulus (MPa)

Q :

Shear force at both ends of the column (kN)

M :

Bending moment at both ends of the column (kN·m)

P :

Lateral load (kN)

P c :

Lateral load at cracking condition (kN)

P y :

Lateral load at yielding condition (kN)

P m :

Lateral load at peak condition (kN)

P mo m :

Largest Pm in specimens SRC4-2-JM, SRC4-4-JMrSRC4-2-SD7SRC4-2-FJ, SRC4-4-X, SRC4-2-N (kN)

P u :

Lateral load at ultimate condition (kN)

D c :

Ratio of lateral load to displacement at cracking condition (kN/mm)

θ :

Drift ratio (-)

θ u :

Drift ratio at ultimate condition (-)

μ :

Displacement ductility ratio (-)

μ 0 :

Largest μ in specimens SRC4-2-JM, SRC4-4-JM, SRC4-2-SD, SRC4-2-FJ, SRC4-4-X, SRC4-2-N (-)

Δ :

Lateral displacement at the top of the column (mm)

Δ y :

Lateral displacement at yielding condition (mm)

Δ u :

Lateral displacement at ultimate condition (mm)

W :

Cumulative dissipated energy obtained from the sum areas of hysteresis loops in the full load-history (kN·m)

W 0 :

Largest W in specimens SRC4-2-JM, SRC4-4-JM, SRC4-2-SD, SRC4-2-FJ, SRC4-4-X, SRC4-2-N (kNm)

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Acknowledgement

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51208175) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities(GrantNos.2015B17514and2016B20514).

Author information

Correspondence to Kai Wu.

Additional information

Supported by: National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 51208175 and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant Nos. 2015B17514 and 2016B20514

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Wu, K., Zhai, J., Xue, J. et al. Effect of seismic design details on hysteresis performance of SRC-RC transfer columns. Earthq. Eng. Eng. Vib. 19, 117–135 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11803-020-0551-4

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Keywords

  • seismic design details
  • hysteresis performance
  • steel reinforced concrete
  • transfer column
  • energy dissipation