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Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Vibration

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 835–847 | Cite as

Optimal seismic retrofit model for steel moment resisting frames with brittle connections

  • Hyo Seon Park
  • Se Woon Choi
  • Byung Kwan Oh
Article
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Abstract

Based on performance-based seismic engineering, this paper proposes an optimal seismic retrofit model for steel moment resisting frames (SMRFs) to generate a retrofit scheme at minimal cost. To satisfy the acceptance criteria for the Basic Safety Objective (BSO) specified in FEMA 356, the minimum number of upgraded connections and their locations in an SMRF with brittle connections are determined by evolutionary computation. The performance of the proposed optimal retrofitting model is evaluated on the basis of the energy dissipation capacities, peak roof drift ratios, and maximum interstory drift ratios of structures before and after retrofitting. In addition, a retrofit efficiency index, which is defined as the ratio of the increment in seismic performance to the required retrofitting cost, is proposed to examine the efficiencies of the retrofit schemes derived from the model. The optimal seismic retrofit model is applied to the SAC benchmark examples for threestory and nine-story SMRFs with brittle connections. Using the retrofit efficiency index proposed in this study, the optimal retrofit schemes obtained from the model are found to be efficient for both examples in terms of energy dissipation capacity, roof drift ratio, and maximum inter-story drift ratio.

Keywords

steel moment resisting frame performance-based seismic engineering optimal seismic retrofit evolutionary computation 

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Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grand funded by the Korea government (Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning, MSIP) (No. 2016R1A6A3A11932881).

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Copyright information

© Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyo Seon Park
    • 1
    • 2
  • Se Woon Choi
    • 3
  • Byung Kwan Oh
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Architectural EngineeringYonsei UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Center for Structural Health Care Technology in BuildingYonsei UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.Department of ArchitectureCatholic University of Daegu, Kyeongsan-siKyeongbukKorea
  4. 4.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA

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