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Journal of Ocean University of China

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 391–397 | Cite as

An observational study of typhoon Imbudo in 2003

  • Li Qingqing 
  • Fu Gang 
  • Guo Jingtian 
  • Yang Yuqiang 
  • Duan Yihong 
Research Papers

Abstract

Typhoon Imbudo was a super-typhoon over the northwestern Pacific in 2003. It caused tremendous damage when it made landfalls in the Philippines and China. This paper documents observational analyses of Typhoon Imbudo during its landfall in China. All available observations are used to study its motion, intensity changes, convection, structure and precipitation. Best-track data indicate that Imbudo moved west-northwestward until 1800 UTC 23 July and then turned north-westward. FNL (final) analysis data show that the motion of Imbudo is dominated by changes of the subtropical high. At Imbudo’s mature stage, the minimum sea level pressure dropped to 910 hPa and the maximum sustained winds were as high as 67 m s−1, which is the intensity of a super-typhoon. The surface wind field exhibited asymmetric characteristics. Polar-orbiting satellite imagery also manifested convective asymmetry before Imbudo made landfall in China. Analyzed the vertical wind shear, it is shown that the convection has a downshear-left pattern. All kinds of precipitation data were used to identify the asymmetric characteristic of the rainfall associated with the Imbudo. The maximum rainfalls were located in the southern boundary area between Guangxi and Guangdong. However, the lack of in situ observations limited further analyses of this typhoon.

Key Words

Typhoon Imbudo surface winds satellite imagery asymmetric convection downshear-left convective pattern asymmetric rainfall 

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Copyright information

© Ocean University Of China 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Qingqing 
    • 1
  • Fu Gang 
    • 1
  • Guo Jingtian 
    • 1
  • Yang Yuqiang 
    • 2
  • Duan Yihong 
    • 3
  1. 1.Physical Oceanography Lab, Department of Marine MeteorologyOcean University of ChinaQingdaoP.R.China
  2. 2.Qingdao Weather BureauQingdaoP.R.China
  3. 3.Shanghai Typhoon InstituteShanghaiP.R.China

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