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Journal of Ocean University of Qingdao

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 161–164 | Cite as

Bacteriological analysis of the digestive tube of the mud snail (Bullacta exarata Philippi) and its rearing shoal

  • Wang Guoliang
  • Zheng Tianlun
  • Lu Tongxia
  • Wang Yinong
  • Yu Hong
  • Jin Shan
Research Papers
  • 23 Downloads

Abstract

The bacterial flora in the digestive tube of Bullacta exarata Philippi and its rearing shoal were investigated. A total of 157 strains of heterotrophic bacteria, isolated from crop, stomach intestine and other parts of the digestive tube, mainly belong to the genera Photobacterium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas Vibrio and some genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae. There are significantly more varieties of bacteria in crop than in stomach and intestine. A total of 173 strains of bacteria were isolated from the rearing shoal, belonging to 13 genera. The 5 predominant genera, such as Bacillus and Photobacterium, are the same as those in the digestive tube, but greatly differ in percentages. The number of heterotrophic bacteria and Vibrio in rearing shoal change in line with the alteration of the temperature, and are significantly affected by the use of pesticides.

Key words

Bullacta exarata Philippi heterotrophic bacteria Vibrio digestive tube rearing shoal 

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Copyright information

© Ocean University of Qingdao (OUQ) 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wang Guoliang
    • 1
  • Zheng Tianlun
    • 1
  • Lu Tongxia
    • 1
  • Wang Yinong
    • 1
  • Yu Hong
    • 1
  • Jin Shan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oceanology and FisheryNingbo UniversityNingboP. R. China

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