Bioreduction of nitrate in groundwater using a pilot-scale hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor

  • Youneng Tang
  • Michal Ziv-El
  • Chen Zhou
  • Jung Hun Shin
  • Chang Hoon Ahn
  • Kerry Meyer
  • Daniel Candelaria
  • David Friese
  • Ryan Overstreet
  • Rick Scott
  • Bruce E. Rittmann
Research Article

Abstract

A long-term pilot-scale H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was tested for removal of nitrate from actual groundwater. A key feature of this second-generation pilot MBfR is that it employed lower cost polyester hollow fibers and still achieved high loading rate. The steady-state maximum nitrate surface loading at which the effluent nitrate and nitrite concentrations were below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) was at least 5.9 g·N·(m2·d)−1, which corresponds to a maximum volumetric loading of at least 7.7 kg·N·(m3·d) −1. The steady-state maximum nitrate surface area loading was higher than the highest nitrate surface loading reported in the first-generation MBfRs using composite fibers (2.6 g·N·(m2·d)−1). This work also evaluated the H2-utilization efficiency in MBfR. The measured H2 supply rate was only slightly higher than the stoichiometric H2-utilization rate. Thus, H2 utilization was controlled by diffusion and was close to 100% efficiency, as long as biofilm accumulated on the polyester-fiber surface and the fibers had no leaks.

Keywords

denitrification groundwater treatment hydrogen membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) polyester fiber 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Youneng Tang
    • 1
  • Michal Ziv-El
    • 1
  • Chen Zhou
    • 1
  • Jung Hun Shin
    • 1
  • Chang Hoon Ahn
    • 1
  • Kerry Meyer
    • 2
  • Daniel Candelaria
    • 2
  • David Friese
    • 3
  • Ryan Overstreet
    • 3
  • Rick Scott
    • 4
  • Bruce E. Rittmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Environmental BiotechnologyBiodesign Institute at Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.CH2M HillEnglewoodUSA
  3. 3.Applied Process Technology, Inc.Pleasant HillUSA
  4. 4.GlendaleUSA

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