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Comparison of simultaneous distillation extraction and solid-phase micro-extraction for determination of volatile constituents in tobacco flavor

  • Zhong Ke-jun 
  • Wei Wan-zhi Email author
  • Guo Fang-qiu 
  • Huang Lan-fang 
Article

Abstract

The volatile and semi-volatile components in tobacco flavor additives were extracted by both simultaneous distillation extraction and solid-phase micro-extraction. Extraction conditions for solid-phase micro-extraction were optimized with information theory. Then, detection were accomplished by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Characteristic of each method was compared. Qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis of 6# tobacco flavor sample were accomplished through both simultaneous distillation extraction and solid-phase micro-extraction. The experimental results show that solid-phase micro-extraction method is the first choice for qualitative analysis and simultaneous distillation extraction is another good selection for quantitative analysis. By means of simultaneous distillation extraction, 20 components are identified, accounting for 92.77% of the total peak areas. Through solidphase micro-extraction, there are 17 components identified accounting for 91.49% of the total peak areas. The main aromatic components in 6# tobacco flavor sample are propanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-, ethyl ester, menthol and menthyl acetate. The presented method has been successfully used for quality control of tobacco flavor.

Key words

simultaneous distillation extraction solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry tobacco flavor 

CLC number

O657.63 

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Copyright information

© Central South University 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhong Ke-jun 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Wan-zhi 
    • 1
    Email author
  • Guo Fang-qiu 
    • 3
  • Huang Lan-fang 
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringHunan UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Technical Center of Changde Cigarette FactoryChangdeChina
  3. 3.School of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringCentral South UniversityChangshaChina

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