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Journal of Cancer Survivorship

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 647–650 | Cite as

Long-term survivors of childhood cancer: cure and care—the Erice Statement (2006) revised after 10 years (2016)

  • Momcilo Jankovic
  • Riccardo Haupt
  • John J. Spinetta
  • Joern D. Beck
  • Julianne Byrne
  • Gabriele Calaminus
  • Herwig Lackner
  • Andrea Biondi
  • Kevin Oeffinger
  • Melissa Hudson
  • Roderick Skinner
  • Gregory Reaman
  • Helena van der Pal
  • Leontien Kremer
  • Jaap den Hartogh
  • Gisela Michel
  • Eva Frey
  • Edit Bardi
  • Michael Hawkins
  • Katie Rizvi
  • Monica Terenziani
  • Maria Grazia Valsecchi
  • Gerlind Bode
  • Meriel Jenney
  • Florent de Vathaire
  • Stanislaw Garwicz
  • Gill A. Levitt
  • Desiree Grabow
  • Claudia E. Kuehni
  • Martin Schrappe
  • Lars Hjorth
  • participants in PanCare
Article

Abstract

Purpose

The number of persons who have successfully completed treatment for a cancer diagnosed during childhood and who have entered adulthood is increasing over time, and former patients will become aging citizens.

Methods

Ten years ago, an expert panel met in Erice, Italy, to produce a set of principles concerning the cure and care of survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer. The result was the Erice Statement (Haupt et al. Eur J Cancer 43(12):1778–80, 2007) that was translated into nine languages. Ten years on, it was timely to review, and possibly revise, the Erice Statement in view of the changes in paediatric oncology and the number and results of international follow-up studies conducted during the intervening years.

Results

The long-term goal of the cure and care of a child with cancer is that he/she becomes a resilient and autonomous adult with optimal health-related quality of life, accepted in society at the same level as his/her age peers. “Cure” refers to cure from the original cancer, regardless of any potential for, or presence of, remaining disabilities or side effects of treatment. The care of a child with cancer should include complete and honest information for parents and the child.

Conclusions and implication for cancer survivors

Some members of the previous expert panel, as well as new invited experts, met again in Erice to review the Erice Statement, producing a revised version including update and integration of each of the ten points. In addition, a declaration has been prepared, by the Childhood Cancer International Survivors Network in Dublin on October 2016 (see Annex 1).

Keywords

Childhood cure Childhood care Health Quality of life 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Erice workshop was organized thanks to the support of the G. Gaslini Foundation, Foundation MBBM, AIEOP, FIAGOP, and the M. Letizia Verga Committee. We thank Ms. Carla Manganini for her excellent secretarial and editorial assistance.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

11764_2018_701_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (296 kb)
ANNEX 1 Childhood Cancer International (CCI) Survivors Network. Declaration of Dublin. Dublin, October 18, 2016 (PDF 296 kb)

Reference

  1. 1.
    Haupt R, Spinetta JJ, Ban I, et al. Long term survivors of childhood cancer: cure and care. The Erice Statement. Eur J Cancer. 2007;43(12):1778–80.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Momcilo Jankovic
    • 1
  • Riccardo Haupt
    • 2
  • John J. Spinetta
    • 3
  • Joern D. Beck
    • 4
    • 5
  • Julianne Byrne
    • 6
  • Gabriele Calaminus
    • 7
  • Herwig Lackner
    • 8
  • Andrea Biondi
    • 1
  • Kevin Oeffinger
    • 9
  • Melissa Hudson
    • 10
  • Roderick Skinner
    • 11
  • Gregory Reaman
    • 12
  • Helena van der Pal
    • 13
  • Leontien Kremer
    • 13
    • 14
  • Jaap den Hartogh
    • 15
  • Gisela Michel
    • 16
  • Eva Frey
    • 17
  • Edit Bardi
    • 18
    • 19
  • Michael Hawkins
    • 20
  • Katie Rizvi
    • 21
  • Monica Terenziani
    • 22
  • Maria Grazia Valsecchi
    • 23
  • Gerlind Bode
    • 24
  • Meriel Jenney
    • 25
  • Florent de Vathaire
    • 26
  • Stanislaw Garwicz
    • 27
  • Gill A. Levitt
    • 28
  • Desiree Grabow
    • 29
  • Claudia E. Kuehni
    • 30
  • Martin Schrappe
    • 31
  • Lars Hjorth
    • 27
  • participants in PanCare
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, University of Milano-Bicocca/Foundation MBBMHospital San GerardoMonzaItaly
  2. 2.Epidemiology and Biostatistics SectionIRCCS Institute Giannina GasliniGenoaItaly
  3. 3.Department of PsychologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  4. 4.Hospital for Children and AdolescentsUniversity of Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany
  5. 5.LESS Group, Hospital for Children and AdolescentsUniversity of LübeckLübeckGermany
  6. 6.Boyne Research InstituteDroghedaIreland
  7. 7.Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Children’s HospitalBonnGermany
  8. 8.Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Haematology/OncologyMedical University of GrazGrazAustria
  9. 9.Department of MedicineDuke Cancer InstituteDurhamUSA
  10. 10.St. Jude Children’s Research HospitalMemphisUSA
  11. 11.Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Haematology and Oncology, and Children’s BMT Unit, Great North Children’s Hospital, Royal Victoria Infirmary, and Northern Institute of Cancer ResearchNewcastle UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK
  12. 12.Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children’s National Medical CenterThe George Washington University School of Medicine and Health SciencesWashington, D.C.USA
  13. 13.Department of Pediatric OncologyAcademic Medical Center—Emma Children’s HospitalAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  14. 14.The Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology in UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  15. 15.Dutch Childhood Cancer Parent Organisation (VOKK)NieuwegeinThe Netherlands
  16. 16.Department of Health Sciences and Health PolicyUniversität LuzernLuzernSwitzerland
  17. 17.St. Anna KinderspitalWienAustria
  18. 18.2nd Department of PediatricsSemmelweis UniversityBudapestHungary
  19. 19.Kepler UniversitätsklinikumLinzAustria
  20. 20.Centre for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies, Institute of Applied Health ResearchUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  21. 21.Youth Cancer EuropeVilniusLithuania
  22. 22.Pediatric Oncology UnitFondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei TumoriMilanItaly
  23. 23.School of Medicine and SurgeryUniversity of Milano-BicoccaMonzaItaly
  24. 24.Childhood Cancer International (CCI)NieuwegeinThe Netherlands
  25. 25.Department of Paediatric OncologyChildren’s Hospital for WalesCardiffUK
  26. 26.Cancer and Radiation, Unit 1018 INSERM, University of Paris-SaclayGustave RoussyVillejuif CEDEXFrance
  27. 27.Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Skane University HospitalLund UniversityLundSweden
  28. 28.Department of Paediatric Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for ChildrenNHS Foundation TrustLondonUK
  29. 29.German Childhood Cancer Registry (GCCR), Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and InformaticsUniversity Medical CenterMainzGermany
  30. 30.Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry, Institute of Social and Preventive MedicineUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  31. 31.Klinik für Kinder und JugendmedizinUniversitätsklinikum Schleswig-HolsteinKielGermany

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