Signal, Image and Video Processing

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 595–601 | Cite as

Modified correlation theorem for the linear canonical transform with representation transformation in quantum mechanics

Original Paper

Abstract

As generalization of the fractional Fourier transform, the linear canonical transform (LCT) has been used in several areas, including optics and signal processing. Many properties of the LCT are currently known including correlation theorem, but however, these do not generalize very nicely to the classical result for the FT. This paper presents a modified correlation theorem in the LCT domain with representation transformation in quantum mechanics. The derivation is direct and concise since the authors make full use of the Dirac’s representation theory. The proposed theorem is compared with the existing correlation theorem in the literature for the LCT and found to be better and befitting proposition. As an application, the proposed correlation theorem is used to determine the power spectral density of frequency-modulated (FM) signal, which shows that the same FM signal can be transmitted with less bandwidth requirement.

Keywords

Linear canonical transform Correlation theorem Quantum mechanical representation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the editor-in-chief and the anonymous referees for their valuable comments and suggestions that improved the clarity and quality of this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Electronics and Communication Engineering SectionYadavindra College of Engineering, Punjabi University Guru Kashi CampusTalwandi SaboIndia
  2. 2.Department of Electronics and Communication EngineeringThapar UniversityPatialaIndia

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