Archaeologies

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 300–306 | Cite as

Response to the Commentaries by Vessuri, Elzinga and Fouché

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Abstract

Let me begin by thanking the editors of the Journal Archaeologies for the opportunity of presenting the African Eve Effect as a discussion paper to this journal’s readers and to Rayvon Fouché, Hebe Vessuri and Aant Elzinga for writing commentaries to the paper. Their comments are most welcome for opening up a debate, and I appreciate both supportive remarks as well as reservations expressed.

Key words

African Eve Effect Reward systems of science Anthropological dimension of science Imaginative geographies Frontiers of science 

Résumé

Permettez-moi de commencer en remerciant les rédacteurs de la revue Archéologies pour la possibilité de présenter l’Effet d’Ève africain comme un document de discussion aux lecteurs de cette revue, ainsi que Rayvon Fouché, Hebe Vessuri et Aant Elzinga pour avoir écrit des commentaires sur l’article. Leurs commentaires sont les bienvenus pour l’ouverture du débat, et je remercie leurs remarques de soutien et réserves exprimées.

Resumen

Para empezar deseo dar las gracias a los editores de Journal Archaeologies por haberme brindado la oportunidad de presentar el efecto Eva Africana en un trabajo de debate ante los lectores del journal, así como a Rayvon Fouché, Hebe Vessuri y Aant Elzinga por sus comentarios al trabajo. Sus observaciones fueron muy bienvenidas para abrir el debate y agradezco tanto los comentarios de apoyo como las reservas expresadas.

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Copyright information

© World Archaeological Congress 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Programme for Science Studies University of BaselBaselSwitzerland

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