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Archaeologies

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 3–17 | Cite as

New Subjectivities: Capitalist, Colonial Subject and Archaeologist. Review of “Capitalism in Colonial Contexts”. Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, January 2008”

  • Martin HallEmail author
Review

Abstract

The sub-discipline of Historical Archaeology continues to push out its borders from its origins as the archaeology of British colonial settlement in North America. This review article evaluates the contribution of a set of papers presented at the Society of Historical Archaeology meeting in Albuquerque New Mexico in early 2008, and shows how new theoretical formulations are taking shape.

Keywords

Historical archaeology Capitalism Colonialism 

Résumé

La sous-discipline de l’archéologie historique continue à faire reculer ses frontières de ses origines en tant qu’archéologie de l’implantation du colonialisme britannique en Amérique du Nord. Cet article évalue la contribution d’un ensemble d’articles présentés à la Society of Historical Archaeology à l’occasion de la rencontre qui s’est tenue à Albuquerque au Nouveau Mexique au début de l’année 2008, et montre comment les nouvelles formulations théoriques prennent effet.

Resumen

Desde sus orígenes en los trabajos arqueológicos de la colonización británica de Norteamérica, la sub disciplina de Arqueología Histórica ha ido ampliando sus límites. Este artículo revisado evalúa la contribución de una serie de trabajos presentados en la junta de la Sociedad de Arqueología Histórica en Alburquerque (Nuevo México) a principios del 2008, y demuestra que las formulaciones teóricas están empezando a tomar forma.

Notes

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Copyright information

© World Archaeological Congress 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa

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