Archaeologies

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 9–59

Dwelling at the margins, action at the intersection? Feminist and indigenous archaeologies, 2005

  • Margaret W. Conkey
Discussion Article

Abstracto

Este artículo aborda los posibles interconexiones entre lo que podría considerarse arqueología feminista y arqueología indigenista. El ensayo pasa de una historia de intersecciones en la Escuela Occidental a una consideración de ambas arqueologías, sus diferencias y sus posibles intereses comunes, y pregunta “jqué puede conseguirse a partir de un enfoque interconectado?” Existen dos dimensiones de la interpretación arqueológica que integran a los eruditos de ambas arqueologías, la feminista y la indigenista: (1) el lugar y el papel de “la experiencia”, y (2) el uso de las narraciones de cuentos y las tradiciones orales. Se sugieren para la arqueología algunas metodologías que descolonizan y alguna contra-investigación. Finalmente, se discuten dos aspectos de la arqueología en los que la interconexión y la colaboración podrían ser especialmente fructíferas: en cómo se sobreentiende el papel del género y en la arqueología espacial. Sugiriendo que ambas arqueologías trabajan hacia la transformación de las prácticas arqueológicas, esta revisión se propone promover el desarrollo adicional de conciencias de coalición transformativas.

Résumé

Cet article se situe à l'intersection de ce qui pourrait être considéré comme les archéologies féministes et autochtones. Cet essai va de l'histoire des intersectionalités” dans la pensée occidentale à une considération de ces deux archéologies, leurs différences et leurs préoccupations communes et pose la question suivante: que pouvons-nous apprendre d'une approche intersectionelle. Deux dimensions de l'interprétation archéologique sont intégrales aux modes de pensée des chercheurs féministes et autochtones (1) la place et le rôle de l'expérience et (2) l'utilisation de la tradition orale et de la petite histoire. Des méthodologies décolonisatrices et une contre-recherche en archéologie est suggérée. Finalement, nous discutons deux aspects de la recherche en archéologie où l'intersectionalité et la collaboration sont particulièrement enrichissantes: celui de la comprèhension des rôles sexuels et celui de l'archéologie de l'espace. En suggérant que ces deux archéologies travaillent à la transformation des pratiques archéologiques, cette révision désire encourager le développement futur d'une conscience coalitionelle transformative.

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Copyright information

© World Archaeological Congress 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret W. Conkey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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