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General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

, Volume 60, Issue 8, pp 514–517 | Cite as

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant after living-donor lobar lung transplantation: report of a case

  • Tsuyoshi ShojiEmail author
  • Toru Bando
  • Takuji Fujinaga
  • Fengshi Chen
  • Mitsutomo Kohno
  • Miharu Yabe
  • Hiromasa Yabe
  • Hiroshi Date
Case Report

Abstract

Living-donor lobar lung transplantation was performed in a 10-year-old boy with bronchiolitis obliterans after bone marrow transplantation for recurrent acute myeloid leukemia. He developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) due to calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) postoperatively, which was recovered with suspension of CNI. PRES should be considered one of the important morbidity after lung transplantation.

Keywords

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome Living-donor lobar lung transplantation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We have no financial relationships to disclose in relation to this report.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsuyoshi Shoji
    • 1
    Email author
  • Toru Bando
    • 1
  • Takuji Fujinaga
    • 1
  • Fengshi Chen
    • 1
  • Mitsutomo Kohno
    • 2
  • Miharu Yabe
    • 3
  • Hiromasa Yabe
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Date
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic SurgeryKyoto UniversitySakyo-ku, KyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of General Thoracic SurgeryKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Cell TransplantationTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan

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