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Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 88, Issue 7, pp 1019–1028 | Cite as

Effect of Soybean Oil Fatty Acid Composition and Selenium Application on Biodiesel Properties

  • Benjamin D. Fallen
  • Vincent R. Pantalone
  • Carl E. Sams
  • Dean A. Kopsell
  • Steven F. Vaughn
  • Bryan R. Moser
Original Paper

Abstract

Biodiesel consisting principally of monounsaturated fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) has been reported to have the optimal balance between cold flow properties and oxidative stability, therefore producing a superior fuel. In addition, treating biodiesel with antioxidants such as selenium (Se) also increases oxidative stability. Fuel properties including acid value (AV), cloud point (CP), iodine value (IV), pour point (PP), peroxide value (PV), induction period (IP), onset temperature (OT), and kinematic viscosity (KV) were used to evaluate a newly developed Roundup Ready® soybean recombinant inbred line (RIL) and a commercial cultivar. The RIL had a fatty acid profile with elevated levels of monounsaturated FAME. TN07-93RR was determined as the more desirable line for production of biodiesel, based on its fatty acid composition and subsequent fuel properties. The commercial cultivar AG3906 contained the highest abundance of polyunsaturated FAME and exhibited comparatively high IV and low oxidative stability. AG3906 was therefore not acceptable under the European biodiesel standard, EN 14214. However, TN07-93RR and AG3906 both were considered satisfactory according to the American biodiesel standard, ASTM D6751. Foliar treatment of soybean plants with varying amounts of Se had no effect on subsequent biodiesel oxidative stabilities.

Keywords

Biodiesel Cloud point Fatty acid methyl esters Induction period Oxidative stability Pour point Soybean oil Selenium 

Abbreviations

AV

Acid value

CP

Cloud point

FAME

Fatty acid methyl ester(s)

KV

Kinematic viscosity

IP

Induction period

IV

Iodine value

OT

Onset temperature

PV

Peroxide value

PP

Pour point

RIL

Recombinant inbred line

Se

Selenium

SME

Soybean methyl ester

Notes

Acknowledgments

We appreciate the support provided by the University of Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station and the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board. We also appreciate the support by the Better Bean Initiative of the United Soybean Board, which led to the development of the increased oleic soybean lines that made this research possible. The authors acknowledge Benetria N. Banks and Ray K. Holloway for their excellent technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© AOCS 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin D. Fallen
    • 1
  • Vincent R. Pantalone
    • 1
  • Carl E. Sams
    • 1
  • Dean A. Kopsell
    • 1
  • Steven F. Vaughn
    • 2
  • Bryan R. Moser
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant SciencesUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research1815 N. University St PeoriaPeoriaUSA

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