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Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 83, Issue 4, pp 323–329 | Cite as

Analytical characterization of hemp (Cannabis sativa) seed oil from different agro-ecological zones of Pakistan

  • Farooq Anwar
  • Sajid Latif
  • Muhammad Ashraf
Articles

Abstract

Cold-pressed oil content of Cannabis sativa (hemp) seeds from three different agro-ecological zones of Pakistan ranged from 26.90 to 31.50%. Protein, fiber, ash, and moisture content were found to be 23.00–26.50, 17.00–20.52, 5.00–7.60, and 5.60–8.50%, respectively. Results of some other physical and chemical parameters of the oil were as follows: iodine value, 154.00–165.00; refractive index (40°C), 1.4698–1.4750; density (24°C), 0.9180–0.9270 mg ml−1; saponification value, 184.00–190.00; unsaponifiable matter, 0.70–1.25%; and color (1-in cell), 0.50–0.80 R+27.00–32.00 Y. The induction period (Rancimat, 20 L h−1, 120°C) of the nondegummed and degummed oils ranged from 1.35 to 1.72 h and from 1.20 to 1.49 h, respectively. Specific extinctions at 232 and 270 nm were 3.50–4.18 and 0.95–1.43, respectively. The hemp oils investigated were found to contain high levels of linoleic acid, 56.50–60.50%, followed by α-linolenic, oleic, palmitic, stearic, and γ-linolenic acids: 16.85–20.00, 10.17–14.03, 5.75–8.27, 2.19–2.79, and 0.63–1.65%, respectively. Tocopherols (α, γ, and δ) in the nondegummed oils were found to be 54.02–60.40, 600.00–745.00, 35.00–45.60, respectively, and were reduced to 29.90–50.00, 590.00–640.00, and 30.40–39.50 mg kg−1, respectively, after degumming. The results of the present analytical study, compared with those found in the typical literature on hempseed oils, showed C. sativa indigenous to Pakistan to be a potentially valuable nonconventional oilseed crop of comparable quality.

Key words

Agro-ecological zones of Pakistan analytical characterization Cannabis sativa fatty acids oxidative stability tocopherols 

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of AgricultureFaisalabadPakistan
  2. 2.Department of BotanyUniversity of AgricultureFaisalabadPakistan

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