Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 84, Issue 1, pp 47–54 | Cite as

Fatty Acid Composition of the Oil from Developing Seeds of Different Varieties of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

  • Umit Gecgel
  • Mehmet Demirci
  • Enver Esendal
  • Murat Tasan
Original Paper

Abstract

Fatty acid composition and moisture and oil content were determined for Montola-2001 and Centennial safflower varieties at three different harvest dates from flowering to maturity, which were grown as autumn and spring crops in two different locations in 2001–2002 and 2002–2003. The experiment was carried out using split–split plots in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Sowing dates affected oil content and fatty acid compositions significantly (P < 0.01), whereas moisture content in both years was not significantly affected. Moisture content declined 15 days from flowering period to maturity, while oil content increased. The rate of the palmitic acid formation decreased in both varieties 15 days from flowering period to maturity, whereas formation rates of the oleic and linoleic acids increased in Montola-2001 and Centennial varieties, respectively.

Keywords

Fatty acid composition Harvest date Safflower varieties Sowing date 

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Copyright information

© AOCS 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Umit Gecgel
    • 1
  • Mehmet Demirci
    • 1
  • Enver Esendal
    • 2
  • Murat Tasan
    • 1
  1. 1.Tekirdag Agricultural Faculty, Department of Food EngineeringTrakya UniversityTekirdagTurkey
  2. 2.Tekirdag Agricultural Faculty, Department of Field CropsTrakya UniversityTekirdagTurkey

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