Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 223–229 | Cite as

Frying performance of low-linolenic acid soybean oil

Article

Abstract

The frying performance of low-linolenic acid soybean oil from genetically modified soybeans was examined. Partially hydrogenated and unhydrogenated low-linolenic acid soybean oils were compared to two partially hydrogenated soybean frying oils. Frying experiments utilizing shoestring potatoes and fish nuggets were conducted. Frying oil performance was evaluated by measuring free fatty acid content, p-anisidine value, polar compound content, soap value, maximal foam height, polymeric material content, and Lovibond red color. The hydrogenated low-linolenic soybean oil (Hyd-LoLn) consistently had greater (P<0.05) free fatty acid content and lower p-anisidine values and polymeric material content than did the other oils. Hyd-LoLn generally was not significantly different from the traditional oils for polar content, maximal foam height, and Lovibond red color. The low-linolenic acid soybean oil (LoLn) tended to have lower soap values and Lovibond red color scores than did the other oils. LoLn had consistently higher (P<0.05) p-anisidine values and polymeric material content than did the other oils, and LoLn generally was not different (P<0.05) from the traditional oils for polar content, maximal foam height, and free fatty acid.

Key Words

Chromatography deep frying lipid low linolenic acid oxidation soybean oil 

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Frito-Lay Inc.PlanoTexas
  2. 2.Department of Food Science and Human NutritionThe University of Ilinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana

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