Lipids

, Volume 47, Issue 7, pp 679–686

Lipid Transfer to HDL is Higher in Marathon Runners than in Sedentary Subjects, but is Acutely Inhibited During the Run

  • Mauro Vaisberg
  • André L. L. Bachi
  • Conceição Latrilha
  • Giuseppe S. Dioguardi
  • Sergio P. Bydlowski
  • Raul C. Maranhão
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11745-012-3685-y

Cite this article as:
Vaisberg, M., Bachi, A.L.L., Latrilha, C. et al. Lipids (2012) 47: 679. doi:10.1007/s11745-012-3685-y

Abstract

Although exercise increases HDL-cholesterol, exercise-induced changes in HDL metabolism have been little explored. Lipid transfer to HDL is essential for HDL’s role in reverse cholesterol transport. We investigated the effects of acute exhaustive exercise on lipid transfer to HDL. We compared plasma lipid, apolipoprotein and cytokine levels and in vitro transfer of four lipids from a radioactively labeled lipid donor nanoemulsion to HDL in sedentary individuals (n = 28) and in marathon runners (n = 14) at baseline, immediately after and 72 h after a marathon. While HDL-cholesterol concentrations and apo A1 levels were higher in marathon runners, LDL-cholesterol, apo B and triacylglycerol levels were similar in both groups. Transfers of non-esterified cholesterol [6.8 (5.7–7.2) vs. 5.2 (4.5–6), p = 0.001], phospholipids [21.7 (20.4–22.2) vs. 8.2 (7.7–8.9), p = 0.0001] and triacylglycerol [3.7 (3.1–4) vs. 1.3 (0.8–1.7), p = 0.0001] were higher in marathon runners, but esterified-cholesterol transfer was similar. Immediately after the marathon, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol concentrations and apo A1 levels were unchanged, but apo B and triacylglycerol levels increased. Lipid transfer of non-esterified cholesterol [6.8 (5.7–7.2) vs. 5.8 (4.9–6.6), p = 0.0001], phospholipids [21.7 (20.4–22.2) vs. 19.1 (18.6–19.3), p = 0.0001], esterified-cholesterol [3.2 (2.2–3.8) vs. 2.3 (2–2.9), p = 0.02] and triacylglycerol [3.7 (3.1–4) vs. 2.6 (2.1–2.8), p = 0.0001] to HDL were all reduced immediately after the marathon but returned to baseline 72 h later. Running a marathon increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels, but after 72 h these values returned to baseline. Lipid transfer, except esterified-cholesterol transfer, was higher in marathon runners than in sedentary individuals, but the marathon itself acutely inhibited lipid transfer. In light of these novel observations, further study is required to clarify how these metabolic changes can influence HDL composition and anti-atherogenic function.

Keywords

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) HDL metabolism Cholesterol Exercise training and lipids Nanoemulsions Cytokines 

Abbreviations

HDL

High-density lipoprotein

LDL

Low-density lipoprotein

HDL-C

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

LDL-C

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

VLDL

Very low-density lipoprotein

IDL

Intermediate-density lipoprotein

Apo

Apolipoprotein

CETP

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein

PLTP

Phospholipid transfer protein

NEC

Non-esterified cholesterol

EC

Esterified cholesterol

PL

Phospholipids

TAG

Triacylglycerol(s)

IL

Interleukin

TNF

Tumor necrosis factor

CHD

Coronary heart disease

PON

Paraoxonase

BMI

Body mass index

NaCl

Sodium chloride

KBr

Potassium bromide

Copyright information

© AOCS 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Vaisberg
    • 1
  • André L. L. Bachi
    • 2
  • Conceição Latrilha
    • 3
  • Giuseppe S. Dioguardi
    • 5
  • Sergio P. Bydlowski
    • 4
  • Raul C. Maranhão
    • 3
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of OtorhinolaryngologyFederal University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyFederal University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  3. 3.The Heart Institute (InCor)University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  4. 4.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of São Paulo Medical SchoolSão PauloBrazil
  5. 5.Dante Pazzanese Institute of CardiologySão PauloBrazil
  6. 6.Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  7. 7.Laboratório de Metabolismo de LípidesInstituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clinicas, FMUSPSão PauloBrazil

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