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Production Engineering

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 11–23 | Cite as

Experimental studies and FEM simulation of helical-shaped deep hole twist drills

  • Ekrem OezkayaEmail author
  • Sebastian Michel
  • Dirk Biermann
Production Process
  • 263 Downloads

Abstract

This study investigates the chip formation in drilling of AISl 316L stainless steel using TiAIN coated helical-shaped deep hole twist drills. The aim of this research is to determine suitable cutting parameters with a focus on favourable chip formation, to achieve a better process stability. The experimental investigations were conducted with varying cutting speed, feed rate and cooling lubricant pressure, in stages that were based on the recommendations of the tool manufacturer. In addition to the experimental tests, the mechanical loads and chip formation were simulated with the aim of providing a basis for the simulative development of the tool shape and the cutting parameters. With mathematical methods, a geometrical kinematic imprint, in accordance to the axial feed force of the helical-shaped deep hole twist drill, was implemented into the three-dimensional workpiece model. Based on the experimental results, which show that the chip shape has a great dependence on the feed rate, which in turn strongly affects the feed force and the drilling torque suitable cutting parameters were chosen for the simulation. The simulation results were validated with the experimental data and show a good agreement.

Keywords

3D FEM chip formation simulation Helical-shaped deep hole twist drills AISl 316L 

List of symbols

A

Yield stress, N/mm2

AG

Elongation, %

B

Strain hardening

C

Strain hardening coefficient

cp,w

Specific heat, J/(kg K)

D

Bore hole diameter, mm

d

Tool diameter, mm

Ft

Feed force, N

f

Feed rate, mm

h

Heat transfer coefficient, W/m2 K

kw

Thermal conductivity, W/(m K)

lt

Drilling depth, mm

ltmax

Maximum drilling depth, mm

lsim

Simulation length, mm

l

Length, mm

Mt

Torque, Nm

m

Exponent for softening

n

Rotation speed, min−1

nmax

Maximum rotation speed, min−1

p

Coolant pressure, bar

pmax

Maximum coolant pressure, bar

pmin

Minimum coolant pressure, bar

l/d

Length-to-diameter ratio

R

Drill radius, mm

Rm,RT

Ultimate tensile strength, MPa

Rp0.2

Yield strength, MPa

t

Time, s

T

Temperature, K

Tr

Reference temperature, K

Tm

Melting temperature, K

v

Viscosity, mm2/sec

\(\dot {v}\)

Volume flow, L/min

vc

Cutting speed, m/min

vf

Feed velocity, mm/s

vfmax

Maximum feed rate, mm min−1

Z

Reduction of area, %

Greek symbols

\(\alpha \)

Cutting lip angle, degree

λ

Thermal conductivity, W/m K

\(\varepsilon \)

Plastic strain, -

\(\dot {\varepsilon }\)

Strain rate, 1/s

\({\dot {\varepsilon }_0}\)

Reference strain rate, 1/s

\(\sigma \)

Equivalent stress, N/mm2

\({\varvec{\upvarrho}_w}\)

Density, kg/m3

Subscript

max

Maximum

min

Minimum

RT

Room temperature

Abbreviations

BHN

Hardness brinell

CAD

Computer-aided design

3D

Three-dimensional

FEM

Finite element method

STL

Standard tessellation language

TiAlN

Titanium aluminum nitride

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the German Research Foundation (DFG) for the research Project (BI 498/80).

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Copyright information

© German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Machining TechnologyDortmundGermany

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