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Acta Physiologiae Plantarum

, 41:24 | Cite as

Heterologous overexpression of Lithospermum erythrorhizon LeERF-1 gene increases drought and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis

  • Rong-Jun Fang
  • Ai-Qian Li
  • Ru-Nan Tian
  • Wen-Ju Zhang
  • Ai-Lan Zou
  • Feng-Yao Wu
  • Yong-Hui Liao
  • Xiao-Ming Wang
  • Yan-Jun Pang
  • Rong-Wu Yang
  • Gui-Hua LuEmail author
  • Jin-Liang QiEmail author
  • Yong-Hua YangEmail author
Original Article
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

Ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERFs) belonging to the AP2/ERF family have diverse functions in plants. However, the functions of LeERF-1, a member of ERF family from the medicinal plant Lithospermum erythrorhizon, remain unclear. In this study, by cloning the promoter of LeERF-1, we found that the promoter region contained a number of potential regulatory motifs related to drought and pathogen resistances. Further transgenic studies showed that the heterologous overexpression of LeERF-1 in Arabidopsis displayed phenotypes of higher survival ratio, lower root inhibition rate, slow water loss in leaf discs, and smaller stomatal apertures under drought stress, compared with wild type (WT) of Arabidopsis. LeERF-1 transgenic Arabidopsis also displayed fewer chlorotic symptoms, lower incidence rates, and lower levels of bacterial proliferation on leaves after the inoculation of bacterial pathogen compared with WT. These results suggested that LeERF-1 can also confer drought and pathogen resistances. Our work provided a candidate gene with remarkable potential use in genetic engineering for stress resistance improvement in plants.

Keywords

LeERF-1 Heterologous overexpression Drought Pathogen Arabidopsis L. erythrorhizon 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (31470384, 31670298, 31171161), the Natural Science Foundation of the Jiangsu Bureau of Science and Technology (BK2008265) and the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (IRT_14R27).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

11738_2019_2807_MOESM1_ESM.doc (2 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 2080 KB)

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Copyright information

© Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rong-Jun Fang
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ai-Qian Li
    • 2
  • Ru-Nan Tian
    • 2
  • Wen-Ju Zhang
    • 1
    • 5
  • Ai-Lan Zou
    • 1
  • Feng-Yao Wu
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yong-Hui Liao
    • 1
    • 4
  • Xiao-Ming Wang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yan-Jun Pang
    • 1
  • Rong-Wu Yang
    • 1
  • Gui-Hua Lu
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Jin-Liang Qi
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Yong-Hua Yang
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, NJU-NJFU Joint Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, School of Life SciencesNanjing UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.College of Landscape ArchitectureNanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Jiangsu University of Science and TechnologyZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Co-Innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, Nanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.School of Life SciencesShanghai UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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