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Effects of light on production of camptothecin and expression of key enzyme genes in seedlings of Camptotheca acuminate Decne

  • Yuanyuan Hu
  • Weiwu Yu
  • Lili Song
  • Xu Hua Du
  • Xiaohua Ma
  • Yang Liu
  • Jiasheng WuEmail author
  • Yeqing Ying
Original Article

Abstract

Camptotheca acuminata (C. acuminata) is utilized in preparation of drugs and as constituent in functional foods of China due to high camptothecin (CPT) content in different plant parts. Light intensity is one of the most critical factors which affect plant growth and secondary metabolites. Pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of light intensity (i.e., 100 % irradiance (control), 75 % irradiance, 50 % irradiance and 25 % irradiance) on contents of CPT, activity of enzymes and genes expression related to CPT biosynthesis of C. acuminata seedlings. The study examined total leaf biomass, CPT content, activities of tryptophan synthase (TSB) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), and relative expression of TSB, TDC1, and TDC2 genes. Plants grown in 75 % irradiance possessed the greatest leaf biomass compared with 100 % light irradiance. Highest values of CPT contents were found after 60 days in plants grown in 50 % irradiance, followed by 25, 75 % and full sunlight. Furthermore, activities of TSB, TDC and relative expression of genes of TSB, TDC1, and TDC2, were significantly increased after 60 days of 50 % irradiance compared with full sunlight. Irradiance of 50 % up-regulated the expression of CPT biosynthesis-related genes and induced CPT biosynthesis. In addition to that lower or higher irradiance inhibited the expression of CPT biosynthesis-related genes and CPT biosynthesis. It is concluded that manipulating light intensity can be an effective means to achieve highest CPT yield in medicinal plants.

Keywords

Camptotheca acuminata seedlings Light intensity Biomass production Secondary metabolites gene expression 

Abbreviations

CPT

Camptothecin

TIA

Terpenoid indole alkaloid

TSB

Tryptophan synthase

Trp

Tryptophan

TDC

Tryptophan decarboxylase

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks are extended to Professor Mohammad Shafi from the University of Agriculture Peshawar and LetPub (www.letpub.com) for professional English improvement of the paper. The research study was supported by Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (LZ12C16001.

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Copyright information

© Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuanyuan Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weiwu Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lili Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xu Hua Du
    • 3
  • Xiaohua Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiasheng Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Yeqing Ying
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Nurturing Station for the State Key Laboratory of Subtropical SilvicultureZhejiang A & F UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Forestry and Biotechnology, Zhejiang A & F UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of High Efficient Processing of Bamboo of Zhejiang ProvinceChina National Bamboo Research CenterHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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