Acta Physiologiae Plantarum

, 37:1720

The transcript profiles of a putative early light-induced protein (ELIP) encoding gene in Ginkgo biloba L. under various stress conditions

  • Huanli Wang
  • Fuliang Cao
  • Guangping Li
  • Wanwen Yu
  • Sally N. Aitken
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11738-014-1720-8

Cite this article as:
Wang, H., Cao, F., Li, G. et al. Acta Physiol Plant (2015) 37: 1720. doi:10.1007/s11738-014-1720-8

Abstract

An early light-inducible protein (GbELIP) isolated from immature ginkgo leaves by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method contains a 570 bp open reading frame encoding a 189 amino acid protein, with significant homology to early light-inducible proteins from other plant species. The genomic DNA of GbELIP gene contains three exons and two introns. Southern blotting revealed that GbELIP is a single-copy gene in ginkgo. Light, defense and stress responsive element were found in the promoter region of GbELIP. GbELIP expressional patterns were detected by Real-time PCR at various conditions. ELIP expressions were variable at different time points of 1 day and increasing significantly at the commencement of light illumination then dropping to a basal level gradually. ELIP expression in small size leaves (1–1.5 cm width and 7-day age) was higher then middle (2–3 cm width and 15-day age) and large (4 cm width and 30-day age) size leaves. It revealed that ELIP expression was under the control of developmental regulation. Under temperature and light intensity treatments, GbELIP transcripts accumulation may relate to photoinhibition. The peak expression of GbELIP appeared later by chilling than heating. Meanwhile, GbELIP expression under high light was higher than low light at both two temperatures. GbELIP expression was also increased by wounding and methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) treatment, but not corresponded with increasing malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. In conclusion, GbELIP appears to be induced by an imbalance between chlorophyll formation and degradation during development or under abiotic stress. These results suggest that GbELIP may function in response to environmental signals, possibly regulating responses to abiotic stresses.

Keywords

Ginkgo biloba Early light-induced protein Photoprotection Antioxidant system Gene expression 

Supplementary material

11738_2014_1720_MOESM1_ESM.doc (359 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 359 kb)

Copyright information

© Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huanli Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fuliang Cao
    • 1
  • Guangping Li
    • 1
  • Wanwen Yu
    • 1
  • Sally N. Aitken
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Forest Resource and EnvironmentNanjing Forestry UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Faculty of ForestryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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