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Acta Physiologiae Plantarum

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 247–249 | Cite as

A new semi-determinate tomato hybrid for early production

  • Živoslav Marković
  • Jasmina Zdravković
  • Mirjana Mijatović
  • Radiša Djordjević
  • Milan Zdravković
Genetics and Breeding
  • 57 Downloads

Abstract

By using the knowledge of the genetic constitution and the characteristics of the available tomato lines for selection, there were created several dozens of hybrid combinations characterised by semi-determinate habit, with large fruits and early maturing. These hybrids were tested in preliminary and comparative trials with the hybrids Balkan F1, Balca F1, Žar F1, and some others as standard varieties. These tomato hybrids were grown earlier but they are grown even today in the early production, for the market in green houses and in the open field. The hybrid Marco F1 was the best of all. Its yield was 25 t/ha in the plastic-house (the same as in the standard), up to 32 t/ha in the open field (5 % more than in the standard). This hybrid was a few days later than Balkan, with the fruits weighting 200 grams (fruits were approximately 60 % heavier than in the standard). It possess the genetic V, F and Tm resistance.

Key words

early production F1 hybrid semi-determinate habit 

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Copyright information

© Department of Plant Physiology 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Živoslav Marković
    • 1
  • Jasmina Zdravković
    • 1
  • Mirjana Mijatović
    • 1
  • Radiša Djordjević
    • 1
  • Milan Zdravković
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Institute SERBIACentre for Vegetable CropsSmederevska PalankaYugoslavia

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